Garage Cabinets

Posted: February 26, 2011 in Woodworking

Once the garage was done, I started building cabinets to store all my woodoworking gear.  All the cabinets are similar to the one in the picture.  I like to use maple because it is tough.  I like the look of raised panel doors.  Once you make a few (hundred) they are really easy to do.

Drawer are always mounted with full extension slides.

The Rest of the Bedroom Set

Posted: February 15, 2011 in Woodworking

I finished up my son’s bedroom set by build a corner desk and three drawer dresser.  The material again was birch and I matched the design rounding all corners with no exposed pieces of hardware.

 

I must have finished the bed set sometime in 2002 or 2003.  This furniture served us well but in 2009 my son finally grew out of it.  I ended up keeping the desk for my wife’s hobby room and I sold the bedroom set to a college student for a couple of hundred dollars.

MBA Grade

Posted: February 11, 2011 in Setting Up This Blog Site

Any of you who have read my blog from the beginnig knows that I started this blog because of an assignment in my IT class in the MBA program I will soon complete.  You may be interested to know that I got my grade for this blog, “A”.

More to follow!

Garage Project

Posted: February 4, 2011 in Woodworking

In 2002 I moved to Connecticut.  I confiscated a portion of the basement for a woodworking shop but it soon became apparent that it would not do.  I decided to build another garage and recreate my workshop.  Below you will see a picture of the finished workshop.  It is a long story and I have dedicated a page called “The Work Shop” to explain what happened from start to finish.

Turning

Posted: February 1, 2011 in Woodworking

A friend of mine posted a comment about his woodworking experience.  He like turning bowls on a lathe.  It turns out that the next project in my history is turning candle holders.  The picture below is of my boys and the candle holders we made together.  They presented these as a gift to their Aunt Gail.  The material is cocobola.  Great turning material.

Everyone who owns a lathe ends up making a lot of bowls.  Here are some of mine.  The material is walnut.

Bird Houses and Feeders

Posted: January 24, 2011 in Uncategorized

Probably every woodworker at sometime in his career builds bird houses.  My wife loves to watch and feed birds.  I have been building this Bavarian style bird feeder shown below for a very long time.  I have probably built more than 20.  They make great gifts!

I started out building these from cedar.  They turned out great but cedar is expensive and the bird feeders only lasted one or two seasons.  The cedar weathered ok; however, the birds and squirrels like to chew on the wood. 

I switch over to composite material (plastic deck boards) and these bird houses last for many seasons.

I am often asked how I make the roof tiles.  I start with a 1 x6 board and I cut 1/8″ wide strips.  I stack these up and cut them into 1.5″ long blanks.  Each roof requires a little more than 350 tiles.  The next step is to cut the 45 degree chamfer on the bottom on both corners.  This is easily done with a jig on a router table.

All the tile must be glued onto the roof before the roof sections are cut into the final triangular sharpe.  Fortunately, my wife does not mind gluing the tiles.

The spindle on the top of the feeders are custom made on a lathe.

Here is another picture of the last batch of bird feeders.  (You can also see some of tools in the background of this picture.) I am still looking for a picture of the matching bird house.  I know I have a  one somewhere in my database.

Bird House

If you click on the link above, you can see a picture of the matching bird house built from cedar

The Bed

Posted: January 16, 2011 in Woodworking

The next couple of years I was busy with a new home and I did not have much time to build furniture.  I did build a custom three-tier deck with a hot tube and a 12 ft tall play set for the kids in the back yard.  Once these things were done, I got back to building furniture.

The next major wood working project was a captains bed for my youngest son.  I took the photo in 2003; however, I build the bed somewhere around 1995 or 1996.

The design came out of a woodworking magazine.  As I remember, there were a number of projects that I built out of that one magazine, but the bed was the most ambitious.

This is called a “Captain’s Bed.”  All the corners are rounded and there are drawers integrated under the mattress inside the bed frame.  This seemed perfect for a little boy.

The bed is made out of birch.  This is the first time I used birch on a woodworking project.  I had to go to a mill and special order the material.  This was also a first in my pursuit of woodworking.

Later you will see that I built a matching dresser and desk.  This will be a post for another day.  I recently sold the bed, nightstand and dresser when my son decided after 13 years in the bed, it was time to upgrade to another bed.

I found another picture of the bed just before I sold the set (2009).  This will give you a good idea what the three-piece set looked like and how it functioned.  Not bad considering I started this around ’96 and I sold it in 2009!

Where It All Started

Posted: January 11, 2011 in Woodworking

So this is how it all started……Back in 1992 my father gave me a clock kit.  It consisted of a clock movement, a set of plans and 1 x 10 x 10′ prime walnut board.  My father wanted to do woodworking; however, he never seem to find the time to do it.  He offered the kit to me stating that he would never get around to building the clock.

I was intrigued at the thought of build the clock.  I had never worked with walnut and I believed I was capable of excellent work.  Unfortunately, right after I received the kit, I was transferred to Rochester, NY from Detroit Michigan.  It took several months to get established and finally I started working on the clock.  I had a small workshop in the basement of my new home.  In retrospect it was a terrible place to do woodworking.

My first attempts were an utter failure.  I ruined the entire walnut board trying to cut, router, and assemble.  I still have all of the pieces I tried to make.  I put the kit away for several more months and during this time I read many magazines that taught woodworking techniques

I bought another walnut board ($100).  My second attempt was better but still not acceptable.  I finally finished the clock in 1994 and judge for yourself but I think it turned out pretty good!

Walnut Clock

I presented this clock as a gift to my father in February 1994.  When I gave it to him, I asked to get it back when he passed away as part of his will.  In 2003 (the year I photographed the clock) my dad passed away and the clock was returned to me.

The clock sits proudly in my office.  I look at it every day.  It reminds me to think of my father and it was the beginning of a life long passion. 

I will publish a larger picture of the clock and follow-up with the next story later this week.

Today There has been a lot of changes made to my blog since yesterday.  I am working through the tutorial and I have changed the theme, layout and description of this blog.  This is still very much work in process.

Since this site is going to be dedicated to my woodworking passion, I thought it might be nice to show you a picture of my woodshop under construction.   (Really what I am trying to do is figure out how to add content to a post and to see what it looks like when it is published.)  There is a long story to tell about the woodshop; however, I need to lay some ground work on how I got into woodworking.  I will start with this once I finish setting up the website.

Welcome

Posted: January 10, 2011 in Uncategorized

This is my first blog.  This is part of an assignment in my IT class which is part of the UCONN EMBA program.

Blogging is a new concept to me.  This site will be dedicated to my passion to build things out of wood.  More to follow…..

Hello world!

Posted: January 10, 2011 in Uncategorized

Welcome to WordPress.com. This is your first post. Edit or delete it and start blogging!